Mission and Purpose

Mission Statement

Our mission at AMCC is to create and strengthen an alliance of communities with regional economic development initiatives underway dedicated to achieving sustainability through economic growth, improved environmental performance, and inclusive well-paid job creation supporting initiatives to create new opportunities and equity within a revitalized American manufacturing base.

Purpose

Manufacturing is the leading edge of America’s economic strength in communities around the nation – producing good-paying jobs and economic development at a higher rate than any other sector. Building a better, cleaner, fairer, more secure, inclusive, innovative, and sustainable manufacturing sector is critical to American progress.
In 2018, many IMCP communities and their allies believed that enhancing this collaborative from “a government program” into one that has organizational support from aligned non-profit organizations with missions aligned with the communities’ efforts would add value to all. From this, in 2018 the IMCP communities created the American Manufacturing Community Collaborative (AMCC). Most of the existing IMCP communities joined AMCC, hoping to enjoy the benefits of more organizational support in partnership with other non-profit institutions with similar interests, organizations that can both support and derive value from the work that existing AMCC members produce in as open and transparent a manner as possible.
At the same time, since the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act created a new “designated community” program modeled after IMCP, the stage is set for a new group of designated communities to join AMCC. Focused on designated manufacturing communities that support the defense industrial base, this new Defense Manufacturing Community (DMC) Support Program can learn many lessons from the IMCP communities already in existence. In fact, many IMCP communities have manufacturing themes important to or at least related to the defense industrial base. Many of the original IMCP communities were part of the 40 regions across the country that applied for the DoD designation in 2020.
For those IMCP communities that do not become newly designated communities in this or any subsequent year, either in the DMCSP or in any new proposed designation programs like that in the Endless Frontier Act, being an AMCC member enables manufacturing communities to continue to share best practices with existing communities as always yet with more organizational support as part of the AMCC.
For those IMCP communities that do not become newly designated communities in this or any subsequent year, either in the DMCSP or in any new proposed designation programs like in the Tech Hub Program in the Pending USICA legislation, being an AMCC member enables manufacturing communities to continue to share best practices with existing communities as always yet with more organizational support as part of the AMCC.

Plus, each community will benefit from insights learned from new designated communities that in the future elect to join the AMCC after their designation. We believe that future designated communities will be able to participate as a part of the AMC Collaborative to learn from the existing IMCP communities’ well-earned lessons and provide their own best practices and knowledge in exchange.

The Meaning of A “Manufacturing Community”

What constitutes a member of the AMCC network is broad and inclusive and comes in two categories, AMCC members and BFFs.  BFFs of course mean Best Friends Forever and the AMCC community has been affectionately using this term for years for agencies and NGO experts who have and continue to embrace and work to accelerate the advance of this bottom up model of achieving sustainable development in America:

  • AMCC Members:

A regional collaboration of public and private stakeholders dedicated to building and implementing a regional economic development plan with an important manufacturing component. To be an AMCC member, the regional collaboration must have:

-a written agreement of some kind reflecting the regional collaboration

-a SWOT analysis to inform a regional economic development plan with an important manufacturing component

-a regional economic development plan with an important manufacturing component

-interest in inserting DEI and environmental sustainability into their implementation plans

Examples of AMCC member collaborations are those IMCP and DMCSP designated manufacturing communities, and new BBB designated communities. 

  • AMCC Members must be willing to: 

1) commit one representative and one alternative representative of their regional collaboration to attend at least half of the weekly Monday 30 minute national AMCC calls

2) participate on AMCC’s weekly call when present and once a year provide a 10-15 minute virtual presentation on the progress and best practices of your regional collaboration

3) at least quarterly, share with their regional collaboration stakeholders useful AMCC briefings, resources and other information shared on AMCC calls, briefings, emails and websites 

  • AMCC BFFs

A BFF is a public or private entity that the AMCC Advisory Board deems is an important stakeholder for strengthening American manufacturing and the ecosystem of support it needs.  

Examples of BFFs include federal agency representatives, national NGOs, and private entities that are willing to add open source value to manufacturing communities. 

  • BFFs must be willing to: 

1) commit one representative and one alternative representative of their organization to attend at least half annually of the weekly Monday 30 minute national AMCC calls

2) participate on calls when present and once a year provide a 10-15 minute virtual presentation on the open source value the BFF’s work provides to manufacturing communities.

3) at least quarterly, share within their BFF organization useful AMCC briefings, resources and other information shared on AMCC calls, briefings, emails and websites 

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